Now That We’ve Had A Black President, I Suppose Why Not A Woman? Maybe

Okay, let’s get this straight, our dearly beloved freedom hugging, equality loving country has had forty-four presidents but none of them are females? Oh and an African American was so kindly elected recently, good effort America, I guess now we can end world hunger. In all seriousness, I find it rather a coincidence how black people are accepted first and then come the women. This comment does not imply that I think it is unfair for African Americans, Obama, to have been elected, no it is far from that. What I am trying to articulate is how surreal it is for any one other than a white male to have been president for as long as we have been our own nation. I find it a funny coincidence how voting for African Americans were passed first and then the women followed, its just a funny, not so funny thought.

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But if you asked me, is Hillary Clinton right for the position as the 45th President of the United States? I would tell you to ask this person, Jackie Kucinich for her insightful article on the thought of Hillary’s presidency. Truthfully, I have no idea about Hillary’s battle plans to keep our country running or her viewpoints on any issues. What kind of person is she even?

The initial reason I was for Hillary Clinton when rumors of her as possible 2016 campaign was because she was female and as a female i thought it was about time for one. I made and stuck with my position without looking at her viewpoints and if they matched mine and if she was fit to become president. Therefore, I am looking at this topic through a very biased lens but the underlying messages should not be disregarded. The important point I am trying to make is why has it taken this long for even just the thought of a woman running for president to be finally accepted by Americans.

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Who Needs Human Rights?

Who needs Human Rights, right? I mean it’s pretty cool that we can have slaves just because they’re a different shade from us and are obviously inferior OR that it is perfectly fine to rape women because they’re simply just “asking for it” and because “no” apparently in some unknown language actually means “yes.”

still_not_asking_for_it2Oh and let us not forget to wipe out, let’s say about six million people, I don’t really like how they look but we can keep the blonde hair and blue eyes look though.

Human rights have been a major issue in our country since the beginning and continues to be an issue much like every issue from before, yay for history repeating itself. The problem lies within our society and the society of other countries. There are many major human rights issues that are beyond our general knowledge that deserves to have a spotlight on. It is bizarre how we don’t really know anything that is happening around us. I suppose I can only speak for myself, my mind is so set on only the things around me that I feel like I’m in a bubble, keeping me from knowing things that actually matter in the world and not some gold, black, blue whatever dress that everyone seems to be so hung up on. All I’m saying is that, there is so much more out there than what we are being shown. Think about it.

Human-Acceptance-human-rights-33280878-1280-881According to  the United Nations Human Rights, “Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible” the meaning of the text is as follows: Despite whoever you are, where you are, what you do and how you do it, you are entitled to do so without discrimination. In a perfect world, we would all get a long but we are also entitled to free speech and people are naturally butt heads, to put it nicely, so therefore it will not all be a merry go round. But is it too hard to ask for some open-mindedness?

 

 

Fight or Flight?

Through centuries, the country has experienced many controversial issues: women’s rights, racial tensions, gay rights and even as far back as our country’s independence. Although these issues remain a hot topic today (not including our independence, hopefully) the intensity of them have slowly lessened. This is through years and years of endless fighting. It is true that we gained our independence from battling it out and  many might have gotten hurt or killed due to these issues but it does not always have to resort to violence.

In this image, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr (third from bottom left) is leading the March on Washington which became one of the largest political rallies for human rights; Jobs and Freedom.
In this image, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr (third from bottom left) is leading the March on Washington which became one of the largest political rallies for human rights; Jobs and Freedom.

We have been successful conducting non-violent methods such as boycotting by walk outs, sit ins or marches. However, without a mass of people dedicated to participate, the cause would simply die down. That problem lies within the ‘environmental movement,’ not too many people are willing to go out there and advocate for their cause. We should ask ourselves:

What is the drive that allows people to advocate fighting for a cause, at the same time, what discourages people from acting out?

The drive that allows people to fight for their cause is their sense of justice and the magnitude of the issue. Furthermore, the more the issue is publicized, the higher the chance that it would cause an uproar amongst the public. The Ferguson Riots is a prime example of today on the wrath of public opinion. The basic story is that a cop killed an unarmed teenager and caused a riot. Later, the jury did not indict the police officer guilty of the shooting, a bigger riot broke out and tear gas became involved. What Mike Brown’s death did was show that once riled up, the community could gather together and become a force to be reckoned with.

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A demonstrator sits in front of the street fire during a demonstration following the grand jury.

In relation to Blessed Unrest, about a growing environmental social justice, Paul Hawken speaks of a ‘movement’ that includes a variety of people, from coast to coast, people of all ages and backgrounds. However, how many of those people will actually try and pursue environmental issues? The main reason, I believe, that a large percentage of people remain dormant and don’t take action is simply because many don’t give a rat’s ass about anything that does not directly concern them, which unfortunately is the ugly truth. So ask yourselves, which would you do: fight or flight?